Diamonds are Forever

 

Diamonds are formed deep within the Earth about 100 miles or so below the surface in the upper mantle. Diamonds are quite old - at least hundreds of millions of years old, but in most cases billions of years old, anywhere from one to three billion years old, a time when the earth was probably hotter than it is today and so conditions were perhaps more appropriate for diamond growth.  

To read more about diamonds check out this link to the Smithsonian. In our blog we want to share some of our most favorite diamonds.

The most outstanding ones for us are diamonds with color:

The Red Diamond

The 5.11 ct Fancy Moussiaf Red. Most other reddish diamonds are ‘cooler’ in appearance and termed purplish red. Courtesy of William Goldberg Diamond Corp.

Argyle-Mine-Diamond


Vivid Oppenheimer Blue Diamond

“The Oppenheimer Blue can only be described as one of the rarest gems in the world,” said Curiel. “It is the gem of gems.”Those details are part of what makes the gem so rare. Rahul Kadakia, Christie's head of jewelry, told CNBC that less than 2 percent of the diamonds found in the world are blue, and only 10 percent of them are larger than a carat.

Oppenheimer Blue

Oppenheimer Blue

According to Christie’s website, this 14.62 ct. diamond called the Oppenheimer Blue, is the largest fancy vivid blue diamond ever offered for auction.

"Blue diamonds range from a very faint baby blue, a powder blue, to a dark, dark-indigo blue [that's] almost too dark," Kadakia said. "Vivid is the purest, most open, almost a happy blue color."

 

Indigo Blue Diamond

Heart of Eternity diamond

Heart of Eternity diamond


Vivid Orange Diamond

The Orange

The Orange

The Orange: The largest Fancy Vivid Orange diamond in the world.

The Graff Vivid Yellow Diamond

Graff Yellow Diamond

Graff Yellow Diamond


Dresden Green Diamond

The Dresden Green is a spectacular rare green diamond weighing 40.70 carats.

The Dresden Green is a spectacular rare green diamond weighing 40.70 carats.

Dresden Green Diamond

Dresden Green Diamond

The most famous natural-color green diamond is considered by many to be the Dresden Green . GIA. The green color in a diamond is the result of exposure to radiation. The source of the radiation can be naturally occurring or performed in a laboratory. Natural radiation is the result of the diamond being exposed to radioactive uranium from rocks near the earth’s surface.


The Argyle Violet Diamond

The ‘Impossibly Rare’ Diamond – 2.83 carat Violet Diamond

The ‘Impossibly Rare’ Diamond – 2.83 carat Violet Diamond

Rio Tinto has recovered its largest ever violet diamond from its Argyle mine in Western Australia. The rough was found in mid 2015 and weighed 9.17 carats. After the polishing was finished, the loss of rough was equal to 69%, much higher than typical loss of 40%-60%. there is a possibility that they tried to get a pure color intensity without any secondary or tertiary color involved which would have been the ultimate goal of a collector.


Unique Pink Diamond

Unique Pink - extremely rare 15.38 carat pear-shaped pink diamond

Unique Pink - extremely rare 15.38 carat pear-shaped pink diamond

The "Unique Pink," the largest Fancy Vivid pink pear-shaped diamond ever offered at auction, came to Sotheby's New Bond street galleries in London. According to Ehud Laniado, the head of Cora International “People are bidding very high prices, which means that they don’t see diamonds as just an expense,” he says. “They are starting to be seen as an asset, more than something you just use in jewelry. In 11 years, pink stones have gone up by 350 percent. Compare that to gold, which only went up 150 percent.” With this said the unique point is made for the pink.